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Pokémon: Let's Go
Strategy Guide

Author(s): Vincent Lau
First Published: 23-11-2018 / 00:00 GMT
Last Updated: 31-10-2019 / 18:47 GMT
Version: 0.1 (????) 14-11-2019 / 02:10 GMT

Pokémon: Let's Go Guide

2 weeks ago · Guide Information · Version History

Post-game

GAME FREAK Office (2nd Visit)

When you’re next in Celadon City, it would be nice to pay another visit to the GAME FREAK office on the 3rd floor of the Celadon City Condominiums. Towards the back, you may notice a character with a new speech bubble. Speak to him and he’ll inform you that he’s Morimito–the leader of the Coach Trainers, and very eager to battle you.

Coach Trainer Morimoto

Pokémon Level Type
Kangaskhan 54 Normal
Flareon 54 Fire
Machamp 54 Fighting
Vaporeon 54 Water
Jolteon 54 Electric
Dragonite 54 Dragon/Flying

Morimoto was the battle programmer in a number of Pokémon games. So it stands that he’s got a pretty varied team.

His first Pokémon is Kangaskhan, which is a fairly novel pick. It can use Fake Out to cause a flinch on Turn 1, Dizzy Punch for STAB and to potentially confuse, Sucker Punch to go first and hit Ghosts, and Outrage to deal hefty neutral damage. Use a Fighting-type if you have one.

Next, he may show off his Flareon. This Fire-type Eevee can use Flare Blitz for STAB, Superpower and Double Kick to put a dent in Rock-types, and Quick Attack to try and attack first. Water-types are ideal, although Ground-types are also worth a shot.

Meanwhile, Machamp can use Superpower for STAB, Rock Slide to hurt Flying-types, Poison Jab to punish Fairies, and Earthquake for reliable damage against most foes. Psychic-types are recommended from an offensive and defensive standpoint.

Morimoto also has a Vaporeon, which is a Water-type Eevee. This one can use Hydro Pump for STAB, Blizzard to scare Grass-types, Double Kick to annoy Normal-types, and Quick Attack for the usual reasons. Since Vaporeon is quite bulky, expect to eat a hit from it. Electric-types should do fine here, so long as they’re in good condition.

On top of that, Morimoto has a Jolteon to complete the Eevee family (for now). This speedy Electric-type can use Thunder for STAB, Shadow Ball to surprise Psychics and Ghosts, plus the standard Double Kick and Quick Attack. Needless to say, Ground-types will make it cower in fear.

Finally, Morimoto has a pretty frightening Dragonite. His one can use Dragon Pulse for STAB, plus an unhealthy trio in Blizzard, Fire Blast and Thunder. Ice-types are highly recommended, but you should be able to get by with a strong Fairy-type as well.

Defeat the battle programmer himself and you’ll be rewarded with 10 PP Maxes.

This is one of the easiest games to complete the Pokédex, so why not give it a shot?

As a reminder, if you speak to the director below the roundtable, he’ll want to see a complete Pokédex. Unless you traded a Mewtwo over from a different game or Pokémon GO, you’ll only be able to achieve a complete Pokédex right now, after becoming the Champion.

Should you manage to record data on all 150 non-Mythical Pokémon (everything except Mew, Meltan and Melmetal), the director will give you a special diploma, plus a Shiny Charm that boosts the rate of encountering wild Shiny Pokémon.

Guide Information

  • Publisher
    Pokemon Company International
  • Platforms
    Switch
  • Genre
    Role-playing
  • Guide Release
    23 November 2018
  • Last Updated
    31 October 2019
    Version History
  • Guide Author
    Vincent Lau

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